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yes indeedly

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yes indeedly

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jhamill
7 days ago
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Indeed
California
angelchrys
7 days ago
Oof
LeMadChef
6 days ago
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Denver, CO
daanzu
11 days ago
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‘Fantastic Landscapes’ Surveys the Vivid Use of Color in Hokusai and Hiroshige’s Woodblock Prints

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Utagawa Hiroshige, “Yamashiro Province: The Togetsu Bridge in Mount Arashi (Yamashiro, Arashiyama Togetsukyo),” from the series Famous Places in the Sixty-Odd Provinces (Rokujuyoshu meisho zue), 1853

An exhibition opening this weekend at the Art Institute of Chicago plunges into the vast archives of renowned Japanese ukiyo-e artists Katsushika Hokusai (previously) and Utagawa Hiroshige (previously). Fantastic Landscapes brings together the vivid scenes created by the prolific printmakers through the first half of the 19th Century with a particular focus on their innovative uses of color. Peach skies, grassy bluffs in chartreuse, and their extensive applications of Prussian blue—Hokusai’s “The Great Wave off Kanagawa” famously layers the chemical pigment—mark a broader shift in the artform. Today, the pair are largely attributed with sparking a worldwide fascination with Japanese prints.

Explore some of the woodblock works on view as part of Fantastic Landscapes below, and see them in person between July 17 and October 11. You also might enjoy this monumental book compiling Hokusai’s Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji and Hiroshige’s delightful shadow puppets.

 

Katsushika Hokusai, “The Back of Mount Fuji Seen from Minobu River (Minobugawa Urafuji),” from the series Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji (Fugaku sanjūrokkei), about 1830/33

Katsushika Hokusai, “Amida Falls in the Far Reaches of the Kisokaido (Kisoji no oku Amidagataki),” from the series A Tour of Waterfalls in Various Provinces (Shokoku taki meguri)

Utagawa Hiroshige, “Plum Garden at Kameido (Kameido Umeyashiki),” from the series One Hundred Famous Views of Edo (Meisho Edo hyakkei)

Utagawa Hiroshige, “Awa Province: Naruto Whirlpools (Awa, Naruto no fuha),” from the series Famous Places in the Sixty-odd Provinces (Rokujuyoshu meisho zue), 1855

Katsushika Hokusai, “A Mild Breeze on a Fine Day (Gaifu kaisei),” from the series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (Fugaku sanjurokkei), c. 1830/33

Katsushika Hokusai, “Kirifuri Falls at Mount Kurokami in Shimotsuke Province (Shimotsuke Kurokamiyama Kirifuri no taki),” from the series A Tour of Waterfalls in Various Provinces (Shokoku taki meguri), c. 1833

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jhamill
7 days ago
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Love these
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Always helpful, 33

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Remembering that the things ‘you no longer have time for’ such as meditation, the daily walk, simple forward planning are the things which return time and space to your daily rhythm. 

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ChrisDL
4 days ago
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New York
jhamill
7 days ago
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"Here in lies the problem of pursuing a new level of consciousness. It has to be...

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"Here in lies the problem of pursuing a new level of consciousness. It has to be done using the only tool we have - our current level of consciousness."
 - Jeff Carreira
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jhamill
7 days ago
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Indeed.
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Techdirt: ‘Google Facing Yet Another Antitrust Lawsuit Over Its App Store Practices, Even Though Android Is Quite Permissive’

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Mike Masnick, writing at Techdirt on the latest antitrust case against Google:

Even the market definition (the key to any antitrust case) is… weird. Obviously, how you define the market will show whether or not there’s a monopoly — and if you define the market as “the products that only this company makes” then of course that’s a monopoly. But that’s not really relevant for a question of whether or not there is anti-competitive behavior. But here, these states have come up with a market definition that is basically just Android. They’re not even doing the “mobile operating system” market. Instead, they claim that the relevant market is specifically “the licensable mobile OS market” — meaning that Apple iOS (which is not licensable from Apple) is excluded.

The licensable mobile OS market also excludes OSs that are unsuitable for mobile devices, such as OSs for simple cell phones, “flip phones,” or feature phones, or for other electronic devices (such as laptop computers, desktop computers, and gaming consoles, e.g., Nintendo DS, Xbox, PlayStation) that are not mobile devices.

If I’m reading this right, they’re actually suggesting that if Google had decided not to license its OS, and not to let competing device manufacturers build their own competing phones, then they would have less of an antitrust case against Google. And that seems … weird? And kind of nonsensical.

Maybe I’m missing something here, but it seems like Apple’s control of iOS is a lot more strict, ditto for Nintendo, Microsoft with Xbox, and Sony with the PlayStation. Google’s decision to license its OS and enable much wider competition, as well as allowing some sideloading and 3rd party app stores, seems a hell of a lot more competitive than all those other services — and yet that’s all being used against Google, but not the others?

What these attorneys general seem to want is something that’s not possible: mobile platforms that have the security and privacy of iOS and Android but the openness of PC platforms like Windows and Mac.

The lawsuit complains about the warnings Android shows to users before they can sideload an app from outside the Play Store. I’ve done that — I actually installed the Epic app store for Android last year, when Epic first filed its lawsuits against Apple and Google. The warnings Android shows aren’t misguided at all. They’re fair and sensible — installing a third-party app store on your phone is dangerous.

Going after Google for its stewardship of the Play Store feels a bit like going after Apple in the e-books case in 2013.

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jhamill
10 days ago
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Gruber still doesn't understand the e-book lawsuit of 2013. It was not about who had the most control of the entire e-book market, it was about Apple conspiring with publishers to fix prices of e-books.
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zwol
10 days ago
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We’ve really got to go back to the older “this company is just plain too large” antitrust rules; those are much harder to game. I like an upper limit on employees at Dunbar’s Number squared.
Pittsburgh, PA

Henry David Thoreau

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Henry David Thoreau

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jhamill
11 days ago
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