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‘That Is Not the Law… You Don’t Know That?’

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As we wait for the votes to be counted in Alabama, Jake Tapper’s interview today with Roy Moore (R) spokesman Ted Crockett is priceless.

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Technicalleigh
15 hours ago
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I had to check the CNN Countdown To Whatever timer to convince myself the video wasn't stuck buffering. Honest.
SF Bay area, CA (formerly ATL)
jhamill
1 day ago
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Speech.......less
California
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1 public comment
diannemharris
18 hours ago
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wow.

Amazon wants a key to your house. I did it. I regretted it.

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Geoffrey A. Fowler, Washington Post:

I gave Amazon.com a key to go into my house and drop off packages when I’m not around. After two weeks, it turns out letting strangers in has been the least-troubling part of the experience.

Once Amazon owned my door, I was the one locked into an all-Amazon world.

And:

Make no mistake, the $250 Amazon Key isn’t just about stopping thieves. It’s the most aggressive effort I’ve seen from a tech giant to connect your home to the Internet in a way that puts itself right at the center.

And:

The Key-compatible locks are made by Yale and Kwikset, yet don’t work with those brands’ own apps. They also can’t connect with a home-security system or smart-home gadgets that work with Apple and Google software.

And, of course, the lock can’t be accessed by businesses other than Amazon. No Walmart, no UPS, no local dog-walking company.

And:

Amazon is barely hiding its goal: It wants to be the operating system for your home.

First things first, note that this article appeared in The Washington Post. The Post is owned by Jeff Bezos. Which tells me that Bezos truly is allowing the Post to be the Post, and that the Post is not afraid to bite the hand that feeds.

That said, the issue here is the walled garden. Once Amazon controls the lock on your door, they can control who has access to that lock, keeping out eventual home delivery by rivals like Walmart, and keeping rivals like Apple and HomeKit from offering door-unlocking services.

Very interesting.

∞ Read this on The Loop

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jhamill
1 day ago
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"the issue here is the walled garden."

Pot calling kettle black?
California
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Why Apple’s acquisition of Shazam is so important

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Michael Simon, Macworld:

Shazam’s main strength is music identification, and that fits well into Apple’s current strategy. It’s not just Siri on our phones: AirPods, HomePod, and Apple Watch could benefit from Shazam’s uncanny ability to name that tune.

And:

On the new Pixel phones, Google has implemented a feature that displays the name of a song playing nearby even if Assistant hasn’t been asked. It’s a neat feature that’s all done locally, and I use far more often than I thought I would. A similar feature would be great on the iPhone, and with Shazam’s massive library at Apple’s disposal it would be far superior to Google’s.

And:

We will already be able to ask Siri to play things like the most popular song in 1986, but Shazam could amplify its knowledge considerably. It would be great to tap your AirPods and ask “Play the song that goes like this …” or “Play that Ed Sheeran song about Ireland.” Shazam might not be able to do that now, but the groundwork is certainly in place, particularly when paired with Apple’s own AI musical capabilities.

Read the rest of Michael’s article. Lots of interesting speculation. As you read, think about Apple’s dive into TV and movie production. Imagine saying/playing a line of dialog, or tapping a still from a movie and asking Siri what movie it’s from.

With ownership of Shazam, Apple can turn that tech loose on the entire ecosystem.

∞ Read this on The Loop

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jhamill
1 day ago
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The points Dave highlights as benefits to this deal are examples of Apple trying to catch up to Amazon and Google in music service features, not smart speaker features.
California
sirshannon
1 day ago
plus, lines like "Shazam might not be able to do that now, but the groundwork is certainly in place" could easily be changed to "Siri might not be able to do that now, but the groundwork is certainly in place"... oh, actually, that is exactly what we've all said/heard since Siri Day 0, maybe one day those things will happen...
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don’t even know

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don’t even know

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jhamill
5 days ago
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Me, everyday.
California
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it was old technology anyways

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it was old technology anyways

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jhamill
5 days ago
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California
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Towering Hyperrealistic Cactus Paintings by Lee Kwang-ho

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Cactus No.95, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Korean painter Kwang-ho Lee (previously) depicts larger-than-life cacti in oil paintings that stand up to 8-feet tall. Every thorn, bloom, and branch is painted with excruciating accuracy, bringing the most minute elements into hyperrealistic focus. Lee studied painting at Seoul National University and is represented by Johyun Gallery.

Untitled 1266, 2017. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Untitled 6202, 2016. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Untitled 1212, 2017. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 93, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 91, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 92, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 98, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 71, 2011. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 96, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

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jhamill
6 days ago
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Those look like real cacti. Amazing.
California
MotherHydra
4 days ago
Oh oh oh oh! I really want to see this in person, great find!
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