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HAY Cane Key Ring

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These Key Rings by HAY are beautiful.

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jhamill
14 minutes ago
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Yes, they are nice.
California
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about my book notes

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At sivers.org/book I have a collection of my notes from the 250+ books I’ve read since 2007.

This page is just to answer some questions about it.

My notes are not a summary of the book!

When I’m reading and come across a surprising or inspiring idea, I save it.

That’s all my notes are. I’m not summarizing the book. I’m just saving ideas for myself, for later reflection.

If I’m reading a book about a subject I already know well, I’ll have very few notes, because not much surprised me.

I kept these notes private for years, but decided it couldn’t hurt to put them on my site.

Notes don’t replace the book

It makes me sad when people email to say thanks for my notes because it saved them time from reading the book.

My notes are just some tiny tidbits with no context. It’s like reading a punchline without the joke. If you hear an elaborate joke, then the punchline — (“The little piece of rope said, ‘No. I’m a frayed knot!’”) — is all you need to remember the full joke. But if you just hear the punchline, without the joke, it makes no sense. I just save the punchlines to remind myself what I’ve read.

Again: these notes are really just for me but I’m sharing them on my site.

If you look through a book’s notes and like the ideas, please go read the whole book. It gives so much more context and meaning.

“How do you use these notes?”

This will always be changing.

For the past few years, when I have a few minutes, I’ll just pick some book from the past that might apply to a situation I’m working on now, and re-read all the notes on it.

I’ve also used them to research a certain subject, like discipline for example, I’ll go search all notes for any mention of discipline, and re-read the thoughts on that subject.

Eventually instead of them being saved in a single text file per-book, I’m going to feed each individual idea into a database, tagged, so I can use some interesting lateral thinking tools. I set up the software to do this, but it’s going to be very time consuming, because most ideas will need editing to become stand-alone ideas, not needing the context of the notes before and after them. So for 250 books, about 100 ideas per book, that’s 25,000 ideas I need to edit.

“Why don’t I see __(some book)___?”

I do read fiction, but I don’t take notes on it. For fiction, I prefer audiobook.

I also read hundreds of books before 2007, but didn’t start taking notes until I realized I was forgetting what I had read.

And ultimately, I only read things that apply to my life or current interests right now. I say no to all requests, and publishers asking me to do reviews.

“Which one should I read?”

Whichever one seems to apply to your current situation. I find books most useful when they solve a problem I’m having now.

By default I have the list sorted with my top recommendations up top. But really the best one for you is the one that speaks to your current situation.

“Don’t the authors get mad?”

No, but this was my biggest surprise!

The main reason I didn’t post these for years is because I assumed it was against copyright law. But I quietly tried it, without announcing it.

Then as the site got more popular, I was scared I’d get in trouble, but instead I got emails of thanks from the authors of those books. Maybe especially since I really am trying to get people to go buy the books whose notes they like.

“Exactly how do you take these notes?”

When reading a paper book, I just underline or circle the bits I find surprising or useful. Then when I’m done reading the book, I type those bits into a text file.

On Kindle, I just highlight the bits I find surprising or useful. Then when I’m done reading the book, I connect the Kindle by USB, copy the «/documents/My Clippings.txt» file, and edit from there.

Either way, I tend to edit a lot, and re-shape the sentences into something that works for me.

“Hey you might like this other book summary site!”

No. I don’t want to read summaries of books. I like reading the whole book!

I aim to read even harder books, like “How to Read a Book” describes well.

Go to sivers.org/book to browse the notes.

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jhamill
45 minutes ago
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"I connect the Kindle by USB, copy the «/documents/My Clippings.txt» file, and edit from there."

I did not know that you could do this.
California
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Iran 2018

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Iran 2018
If you have been on this site before or if you have been following me for a while, you know that Iran is one of my favourite travel destinations. It is easy to travel there, the people are unbelievably kind, and the culture and the history are astoundingly rich. I have been wanting to show my girlfriend this amazing country for a while, so when we suddenly had the time in January, we decided to go. I really wanted to show how kind and open the Iranians are, and how easy and pleasant it is to travel the country. This time - in contrast to the last time I went - we traveled in a more relaxed way, meaning that we spent more time in each place than I did when I went on my own in January 2016. For my opinion on the Iranian people and Iran in general, check this out. For rugged trips to untouched desert, check this out.No more talking, let's get to it:
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jhamill
1 hour ago
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These are great photos!
California
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Rodney Matthews

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Rodney Matthews

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jhamill
2 hours ago
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Reminds me of a Piers Anthony novel.
California
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Akureyri, Northern Iceland Lise Colette / @lisecolette​

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Akureyri, Northern Iceland

Lise Colette / @lisecolette​

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jhamill
2 hours ago
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Beautiful desolation.
California
dreadhead
3 hours ago
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Vancouver Island, Canada
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Doctors tried to lower $148K cancer drug cost; makers triple price of pill

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A drug that treats a variety of white blood cell cancers typically costs about $148,000 a year, and doctors can customize and quickly adjust doses by adjusting how many small-dose pills of it patients should take each day—generally up to four pills. At least, that was the case until now.

Last year, doctors presented results from a small pilot trial hinting that smaller doses could work just as well as the larger dose—dropping patients down from three pills a day to just one. Taking just one pill a day could dramatically reduce costs to around $50,000 a year. And it could lessen unpleasant side-effects, such as diarrhea, muscle and bone pain, and tiredness. But just as doctors were gearing up for more trials on the lower dosages, the makers of the drug revealed plans that torpedoed the doctors’ efforts: they were tripling the price of the drug and changing pill dosages.

The drug, ibrutinib (brand name Imbruvica), typically came in 140mg capsules, of which patients took doses from 140mg per day to 560mg per day depending on their cancer and individual medical situation. (There were also 70mg capsules for patients taking certain treatment combinations or having liver complications.) The pills treat a variety of cancers involving a type of white blood cell called B cells. The cancers include mantle cell lymphoma, which was approved for treatment with four 140mg pills per day, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, approved to be treated with three 140mg pills per day. Each 140mg pill costs somewhere around $133—for now.

Imbruvica’s makers, Janssen and Pharmacyclics, have now gotten approval to sell four different tablets of varying strengths: 140mg, 280mg, 420mg, and 560mg. But the new pills will all be the same price—around $400 each—even the 140mg dose pill. The makers will stop selling the old, cheaper 140mg pill within three months, according to a report by the Washington Post.

The plan nixes any chance to lower costs with lower dosages. Even if patients can drop down to just 140mg a day, they’ll pay three times what they pay now for each 140mg pill.

In a statement to the Post, Janssen and Pharmacyclics explained the move by saying the new line-up is “a new innovation to provide patients with a convenient one pill, once-a-day dosing regimen and improved packaging, with the intent to improve adherence to this important therapy.” They noted that those taking 560mg a day will save money with the new pricing.

But doctors balked at what they saw as an underhanded move. In an interview with the Post, oncologist Mark Ratain of the University of Chicago Medicine put things bluntly: “That got us kind of pissed off.”

Ratain and colleagues wrote a commentary in the weekly newsletter Cancer Letters this month, decrying the price hike and new pill series, calling it “highly unusual.” In addition to thwarting efforts to help lower treatment costs, the doctors pointed out that the new dosage lineup will make it harder to nimbly adjust patients’ doses by simply advising them to take different numbers of pills each day. Switching a patient from a 280mg or 420mg per day dose down to 140mg will require paperwork, filling a new prescription, and having patients return unused pills—a process that can drag out for weeks. And increasing a patient’s dose would either be just as lengthy of a process or risk multiplying their treatment costs even further by doubling or tripling the pills each day.

In their commentary, titled in part “Sales Revenues at the Potential Expense of Patient Safety,” the doctors lay out examples of when quick dosage changes would be necessary. Those include when a patient needs to drop down while they’re on a short course of antibiotics or to adjust for new combination-cancer treatments. “Any putative convenience advantage of taking one pill a day is negated by the marked inconvenience to the patient of having to return pills every time there is a need for a dosage change,” they write.

Ratain and colleagues end with a call to the Food and Drug Administration to look into the matter, “given that it creates a barrier to optimal prescribing for some patients,” they write. “We further urge the FDA to recognize that the combination of the high price per pill and the flat pricing scheme are specific impediments to safe administration, and that ignoring the marketing approach for ibrutinib is antithetical to fostering optimally safe dosing and administration.”

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jhamill
1 day ago
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This coming after the Goldman Sachs guy asking if curing disease was a viable business model it is clear the Free Market and Capitalism does NOT value people's lives. I get that you're in business to make a profit. But, you're in HEALTHCARE to care for people and sometimes that means you have to take a loss to HELP people.

My gut reaction to this would be a bill that would criminally punish CEOs and companies that raise drug prices.
California
satadru
1 day ago
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And thus endeth any future research into probing the lower end of the therapeutic range of drugs still under patent protection. There's just no longer any incentive to improve patient outcomes by reducing price any more.
New York, NY
MaryEllenCG
16 hours ago
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Greater Bostonia
bibliogrrl
1 day ago
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Chicago!
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dnorman
1 day ago
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as someone who may be looking at needing ibrutinib, fuck every single thing about this. recover your R&D costs, sure, but don't price the damned drug out of reach of patients.
Calgary
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